ALASKA
September 2001

NEVADA
October 2001

ALASKA
September 2002

CALIFORNIA
November 2002

FLORIDA
February 2003

WYOMING
September 2003

WYOMING
September 2004

NEW MEXICO
November 2004

VENEZUELAN EMBASY
May 2005

REMINGTON MUSEUM
June 2005

WYOMING
September 2005

ARUBA
January 2008

SOCIETY OF ANIMAL ARTISTS

LABRADOR EXPEDITION
October 2008

ARTISTS FOR CONSERVATION
Information coming soon

DELAWARE
DUCK STAMPS

MARYLAND BLACK BEAR STAMPS

WASHINGTON
October 2010

MYAKKA STATE PARK
Information coming soon

PENNSYLVANIA DUCK STAMPS
Information coming soon

 MAINE
October 2011

BOMBAY HOOK
WILDLIFE REFUGE

ALASKA
2012
 

NEWS RELEASE

LAKE KAMESTASTIN - Labrador, Cabada
September 29 - October 18, 2008

GEORGE RIVER CARIBOU MIGRATION


Responding to and acting on an invitation from the Tshikapisk Foundation in Sheshatshit, Labrador, a small group of 7 artists and 1 photographer went to Lake Kamestastin to meet the George River herd of caribou on their autumn migration, as the Mushua-Innu have for 7500 years. The intent of this expedition was to explore the landscape, plant life and animals around Lake Kamestastin, to be inspired to create images, which reflect the beauty, diversity and value of the region.

TWO PAINTINGS INSPIRED BY THIS TRIP:


"On the Move" - see Originals, large paintings


"The Arrival" - see Originals, small paintings

The long trip began on September 28, with the drive from Philadelphia, PA to Montreal, Quebec, via the Binghamton area of New York to meet with Cole Johnson, one of the other artists going on this trip. The next morning, with my 500 miles and Pierre’s spectacular dinner under my belt, the crew of 8 loaded the 2 vehicles we’d be traveling in and began the long, bumpy and long drive (over 1100 miles and 3 days) to Goose Bay, Newfoundland. It was from here, we would be taking the 75 or so minute flight into Labrador and to our destination …. Lake Kamestastin.

Before we went on this trip, most of the crew had never heard of a Twin Otter plane. As we flew over the landscape, the anticipation of what we were all about to experience began to build. Looking out the windows of this small two-engine plane, I could see the landscape below, which was shaped by the glaciers during the last Ice Age. It was barren and vast, covered with rock and various size lakes and ponds.

Landing on the tundra on the "banana strip" (curved landing area) added to the exhilaration. Once on the ground, with the plane unloaded and gone, the reality and excitement of the adventure began to sink even more. First, all of the gear would have to find its way to the camp, approximately a little over a kilometer (3/4 of a mile) away. And… although the tundra was relatively barren, the various berries, lichens and changing leaves, provided endless colors to the rocky landscape.



Once settled into "camp", each of us began to plan our approach to exploring all the things Kamestastin had to offer. Each of the crew began to focus and discuss the best way to accomplish the prime objective: Find and photograph the caribou. Of course, caribou don’t have a schedule, so as it turned out, it took several days before we began to see the numbers we had expected and heard so much about. Then, early one brisk morning, hundreds and hundreds of caribou entered the water from the south and swam the lake to continue their long journey north. It’s hard to describe the sight of so many animals swimming across in that cold water. There were cows, calves and big bulls and they just kept coming. They were all around us.,


 

Plenty of other wildlife was seen around the Lake too. Bear and wolf sign was everywhere. Red squirrels, porcupines and several black bears were seen, along with a few wolves (which were kind enough to howl early one morning not far from camp).

Lots of birds were observed as well. Among them were ptarmigans, gray jays, snow buntings, red polls, ravens, goldeneyes, pine grosbeaks, Canada geese, a gyrfalcon, a loon, a few golden eagles and one snowy owl.

Each and every day, we took advantage of this amazing place and made the best of our time and every opportunity to see and do as much as possible. The results were some experiences and memories that will stay with us forever. Scheduled to leave on Tuesday, October 12, we began to prepare for our departure on Monday. But…. due to some bad weather (snow and sustained winds of 40 to 50 mph), our plane was delayed for 2 days. A small set back for sure, though it did give us a couple extra days to enjoy our time at Lake Kamestastin.




 

In closing, I must acknowledge and thank the Innu people for inviting us to visit this special place.

A mention and thanks need to go to Tony Jenkinson (and Jordana) for accompanying us on this adventure and all his efforts, which made this trip more comfortable, informative and enjoyable. Thanks also to Rob Mullen and WREAF for inviting me to participate on this expedition. Lastly, thank you to the whole crew . . . Rob, Gary, John, Sue, Jay, Linda and Cole for being good travel companions and making this an awesome trip.


For more information: http://www.tshikapisk.ca or http://www.wreaf.org/

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