ALASKA
September 2001

NEVADA
October 2001

ALASKA
September 2002

CALIFORNIA
November 2002

FLORIDA
February 2003

WYOMING
September 2003

WYOMING
September 2004

NEW MEXICO
November 2004

VENEZUELAN EMBASY
May 2005

REMINGTON MUSEUM
June 2005

WYOMING
September 2005

ARUBA
January 2008

SOCIETY OF ANIMAL ARTISTS

LABRADOR EXPEDITION
October 2008

ARTISTS FOR CONSERVATION
Information coming soon

DELAWARE
DUCK STAMPS

MARYLAND BLACK BEAR STAMPS

WASHINGTON
October 2010

MYAKKA STATE PARK
Information coming soon

PENNSYLVANIA DUCK STAMPS
Information coming soon

 MAINE
October 2011

BOMBAY HOOK
WILDLIFE REFUGE

ALASKA
2012
 

DELAWARE DUCK STAMP CONTEST

2010 Delaware Duck Stamp

Steve was fortunate to have his painting of a single canvasback chosen to appear on the 2010 Delaware Duck Stamp. The win and honor allowed him to judge the 2011 competition, which was a great experience. His entry of a pair of green-winged teals placed third the following year (2012).

Delaware's Division of Fish and Wildlife began the state duck stamp and print program in 1980 to raise funds for waterfowl conservation, primarily for acquiring and improving habitat. Whether you are a collector or a hunter, it's important to know that your purchase of a Delaware state duck stamp and/or print will preserve wetland habitats vital to the survival of migratory waterfowl and many other species.


2012 Entry - Third Place


2009 Entry

Since 1984, Delaware has contributed one-half of its annual duck stamp revenue to support enhancement and restoration of wetlands in Atlantic Canada. To date, Delaware has contributed nearly $900,000 to Canada projects on more than 5,000 acres that produce waterfowl that migrate through and/or winter in our State. In total the program, in partnership with Ducks Unlimited, more than $2.5 million has been raised for waterfowl conservation. The contest is usually held in late March or early April in conjunction with the Delaware Ducks Unlimited Greenwing Event.

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BOMBAY HOOK WILDLIFE REFUGE

I had heard stories about Bombay Hook and the wildlife someone might see there. It wasn’t until I met Wendy that I got the chance and made the time to go. Now, we try to get there several times a year. For us, we find going at sunrise provides the best opportunities to see the diverse animal the refuge has to offer.
 




 
Stretching eight miles along Delaware Bay and covering 16,251 acres, Bombay Hook National Wildlife Refuge provides habitat for wildlife. Four-fifths of the refuge is tidal salt marsh with a mix of cordgrass meadows, mud flats, tidal pools, rivers, creeks, and tidal streams. The upland area includes forests, freshwater impoundments, brushy and timbered swamps, and fields of herbaceous plants.

This diversity of habitats is reflected in the diversity of animal life. The refuge is managed for large numbers of waterfowl arriving in the fall, for migrating songbirds and shorebirds in the spring, and provides habitat for tall wading birds in the summer. Deer, red foxes, and beavers are found on the refuge, as well as many species of turtles, insects, non-poisonous snakes, frogs, and salamanders.

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